One of Everything

Posted on Feb 28, 2015

One of Everything

With a day off and no more errands to run, my sister and I stop off for some lunch in Sonoma County. We pull up to this small diner and park in a gravel lot. As we walk to the front, we pass a large chicken farm. We see the hostess and then are shown to a table under a tent with heat vents. Scanning the paper menu, it hit us that we had discovered gold. From decadent cornbread kissed with local honey, to fried oyster sandwiches with greens, aioli and pressed between a Della Fattoria roll. We both looked at each other and said, “One of everything!”. Boxes to go were definitely necessary. Shown below are a few of the many things we experienced. On the left, collard greens with house smoked bacon, kale salad with pumpkin seeds and cheese, mac n’ cheese with Vella cheddar and asiago, fried brussel sprouts with garlic and rosemary. To sip in between bites, chilled local tap water and 101 North Brewing Co Heroine IPA....

Read More

Three Not So Little Pigs

Posted on Feb 27, 2015

Three Not So Little Pigs

Three Courses of one of our favorite meats: Pork.   Course One: A Creative Take on Comfort Food In a medium sized bowl, steam rises from a very hot dish. After three long days, this braised pork shoulder was carefully pulled into shreds. Black beans cooked to perfection swirl together underneath a pillow of avocado sour cream and long cut scallions. What makes this dish remarkable is the scoop of white cheddar grits. Get a little bit of everything in your spoon and it will be a harmonious experience.   Course Two: Breakfast Entree A breakfast tradition, bacon and eggs will seem unlikely as a main course. However, when melty pork belly meets cooked egg yolk shavings under a drizzle of berry gastrique…you will forget the rules. It is so delicate, a butter knife slices right through it.   Course Three: An Interesting Use of Bacon The ultimate dessert: Bacon immersed in toffee dipped in chocolate on a lollipop stick. The Black Pig Meat Company has designed an friendly way to combine two odd things together. Rich, savory, and easy to eat, it will be gone before you know it!  ...

Read More

Point Reyes Oysters

Posted on Feb 26, 2015

Point Reyes Oysters

Eating oysters at Hog Island Oyster Co. in Tomales Bay is nothing short of cosmic. Shucked to order, laying on a bed of ice is a key that unlocks the coast of Northern California. “Bay to bar” is their motto, bringing the quality of a sustainable aquaculture to the table. However, as I sit at the bar, basking in delight after having my first of many, I realized their motto is something completely different. It’s “bringing the people of bar to the bay”. The fresh sea salt aroma reminds you of the Pacific Ocean, while the taste itself takes you there.  ...

Read More

Persimmons

Posted on Jan 25, 2014

Persimmons

The persimmon is a winter fruit that is full of flavor. There are 100′s of varieties, but the Hachiya and the Fuyu are the most common. The Hachiya is heart-shaped, with bright orange flesh and skin. It should be consumed when it is soft, a sign that it is fully ripe. Unripe, the Hachiya is astringent and inedible. At peak ripeness, the flesh is sweet and fragrant, slightly viscous, with an almost liquid texture. The Fuyu persimmon is smaller and more tomato-shaped. It contains no tannins and can thus be eaten either firm or ripe. Both persimmons are delicious raw, but here are a few other ideas. The Hachiya can be pureed with a few drops of lemon juice and makes a good topping for ice cream and cakes. It also makes a good jam. The Fuyu is very versatile, slice it “carpaccio” style and serve with a citrus panna cotta and Hachiya- cardamom sorbet, or serve raw Fuyu wedges with prosciutto, arugula, pomegranate seeds, and a pistachio-pomegranate vinaigrette. Hachiya Sherbet ⅔ C. sugar ⅔ C. water ¼ tsp. salt ⅛ tsp. cardamom 2 C. Hachiya persimmon puree 1 C. milk 1 C. Half-and-Half 2 tsp. lemon juice Bring the sugar, water, and salt to a boil; reduce to ¾ C., stir in cardamom. Stir together puree, above syrup, milk,  half-and-half , and lemon juice; chill 3 hours and then freeze in an ice cream...

Read More

Friendship Cup

Posted on Jan 25, 2014

Friendship Cup

  The Friendship Cup, also called a grolla, is a round container made of turned wood that is often finely carved. It has a cover and spouts, varying in number according to its size, from which people drink traditional Valdostana coffee (from Val d’Aosta) – coffee mixed with Grappa, Génépy liqueur, sugar and spices. The Cup is considered an artistic object because it is still handmade and produced by only a few workshops of Valle d’Aosta. Friends gather around the table perhaps in front of a fireplace after a day of skiing or, in general, after a long and tiring day at work. After a number of “turns” around the table, the atmosphere warms up and tiredness...

Read More

Reed Avocado

Posted on Jan 25, 2014

Reed Avocado

Reed avocados are absolutely delicious and far superior in texture and taste to the Hass avocado. They are big! When you cut one open, you will notice the pit of the Reed and the pit of the Hass are almost the same size–which means more meat in a Reed. Its thin green skin contains a hefty fruit that can easily weigh a pound or more. The texture is buttery, almost maintaining a melting quality. Its flavor is bold, rich, nutty. Try this recipe for breakfast: Chipotle Mayonnaise In a medium bowl, stir to combine mayonnaise, chipotle, and lime juice. The Rest Toast bread, spread 1 Tbs. chipotle mayonnaise on each piece, top with 2 slices of Reed avocado, 1 piece of bacon, and 1 poached...

Read More